Pot Bellied Pig

Our Resident 

Kevin Bacon has been at the zoo since early 2020. He is still under a year old. 

Creature Features

Description                                                                                                                                                                                        Potbellied Pigs have longer snouts, straighter tails, and more upright ears. They come in four main colors: solid black, pink, white, and spotted.

Diet                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Pigs are opportunistic omnivores, which means they’ll eat pretty much anything given the opportunity, however, they do very well on a vegetarian diet including pellets, vegetables, alfalfa hay or bran. Pigs have a very large digestive tract so they can eat large amounts of food at a time.

Reproduction                                                                                                                                                                                               5-6 piglets are born after a 114 day gestation. The most critical time in a newborn potbellied pig’s life is from birth until the time they are weaned. Pot-bellied pigs should nurse until they are six to eight weeks old. Newborn pot-bellied pigs will grow to be 100 to 250 pounds in adulthood. Rapid growth occurs during the first year of life, but pot-bellied pigs are not fully mature until three or four years of age.

Fun Facts

  • Scientific Name: Sus scrofa domesticus
  • Conservation Status:  Least Concern
  • Life Span: 12 to 18 years in captivity; some can live up to 20 years
  • Body Length: 12 to 20 inches
  • Weight: 60 to 110 pounds
  • Distribution: The Vietnamese pot-bellied pig is a dwarf breed of swine developed in Vietnam in the 1960s. They have been imported to the United States since the 1980s. They are sensitive to the sun and have very little hair on their bodies. In the wild, they wallow in the mud to protect their skin.

Did You Know?

  • The pot-bellied pig’s rounded, sagging belly is a result of a natural dip in the backbone, not due to the animal overeating.
  • Pigs are actually clean animals, but have a reputation for sitting in the mud in order to protect their skin from insects and sunburn.
  • Pigs “root” or dig/explore with their snouts. They love soil.
  • Their skin is usually black, which helps with the lack of hair and fur. More pigmentation means less sun damage.
  •  They have dismal eyesight. Their sense of hearing and smell are exceptional.
  • They are highly intelligent and respond well to clicker training.
  •  Pigs are very vocal, communicating in a range of squeal, oinks, and whines. Mama pigs even sing to their piglets!